Art Leaving the Nest

Unlike a sofa, art strikes an emotional chord not only with the person acquiring the art, but also with the artist who created the artwork. For artists, their works are like their children, whom they’ve emotionally invested in and now have to let go and hope that someone else will care for them as they have.  Galleries also care about where their art lands as it can impact their artists' brands that they've worked hard to cultivate.

But all too often incredible art disappears into private settings after being purchased. This often leaves the artist wondering about the new home of their cherished work, much like sending a child off to college and then never hearing from them again.

Wouldn't it be great as an artist to know that your work has been happily placed in a great setting and that it's not sitting in a dusty attic or still rolled up unframed for years.   As the new owner of a piece of art, there's no better way to build a lasting relationship with an artist whose work you've purchased and now care deeply about than to share how you've placed that work in your living or work space.  

The artist may even have suggestions for you on how best to frame the piece given the setting you're placing it in, how high to hang the piece, whether it can handle more light or should be kept away from light-filled rooms, etc.  

 

Claire desjardins work wth interior design by Victoria Leach with Timothy Johnson design

Claire desjardins work wth interior design by Victoria Leach with Timothy Johnson design

art by sahba shere place in a home

art by sahba shere place in a home

And if you're open to sharing it publicly, it's even more fun for broader fans of an artist's work to see where it ended up.

What Keenlee recommends is to share a picture of the work once it's placed.  This can be a public posting of the art in your home on Instagram or Facebook acknowledging the artist or can be a private email to the artist or the gallery sharing the work.  And, should you ever decide to sell the piece many years down the road, it can always help for the artist and gallery to have a visual record of where the art exists to jog their memory or to help showcase the work to potential buyers.  If you've worked with an interior designer to place the art, they will often take professional images of the art in your space that they'll typically allow you to share.

Of course enjoy your art privately every day you live with it, but the more you're willing to share your art with others, including the original artist, the more rewarding the experience of your art can become!

Art by bibby gignilliat placed in a home

Art by bibby gignilliat placed in a home